Childhood Lead Poisoning: Prevention and Prevalence

Posted on Aug 21, 2012 10:41am PDT

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been trying to minimize the amount of childhood lead poisoning cases in the United States for years. They created the Lead Contamination Control Act of 1988 to work towards this cause by developing programs that would prevent childhood lead poisoning and educate the public and health care providers about childhood lead poisoning. The CDC also ran tests to determine how many children had lead in their blood that could potentially lead to health problems in the future. For example, in Virginia, 100,489 children were tested for lead poisoning, and 3,757 cases were discovered in 2010 alone. On the whole, 238,260 children were confirmed to have high amounts of lead in their system in 2010 alone.

Lead is most often associated with pencils, but can also be found in some paints and other products. The Consumer Product Safety Commission is vigilant in looking for consumer products that have high lead content and can harm children. Just recently, the Commission recalled the Tone World Recliner Chairs in America for violating lead paint standards. Children’s chairs and wrestling action figures were other recent recalled products that violated lead paint. Most often, it is children’s products that are recalled. This is because young children may try to chew on their toys, jeweler, or clothing. When there is dangerous lead on the product, it can create poisoning. In the past, the USCPSC has recalled bike bells, cloth books, toy trucks.

Belts, children’s jewelry, tea glasses, lacrosse cloves, and ceramic piggy banks, just to name a few of the many items. Children who are poisoned by lead obtain headaches, stomachaches, and anemia. They can also have behavioral problems. Lead can also affect a child’s developing brain. If your child has been lead poisoned because of a faulty product, seek justice today! Talk to someone right now to get more information!

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