Premises Liability: Swimming Pools

Posted on Jul 23, 2012 3:03pm PDT

With the summer months providing high temperatures across the country, it is no surprise that people of all ages are taking to their swimming pools to cool off. Although they provide a fun way to spend an afternoon in the sun, it is sadly not uncommon for both children and adults to sustain a serious injury while lounging around the pool. Unfortunately, children are most susceptible to injury when they are left unsupervised. Whether from slipping and falling or accidentally drowning, children have the potential to be involved in a poolside accident at a much higher rate than an adult. On average, 390 children under the age of 14 are killed in an accidental drowning each year, and statistics show that about 70% of these incidents take place in a residential pool.

When a property owner does not take the proper precautionary measures—such as building a fence around an unguarded pool, using a safety cover over the water when a pool is not being used, or supervising a child while they are playing in and/or around a swimming pool—the potential for an accident to occur is extremely high. The same applies for a public swimming pool, as lifeguards are required to receive proper training and warning signs should be visibly posted in the vicinity to warn visitors of the dangers of running and diving. If any of these measures are not taken, the owner of the property may be held liable for any accidents that take place as a result.

If your child has been injured in a slip and fall accident around a swimming pool or has suffered a wrongful death as a result of an accidental drowning on someone else's property, you should not hesitate to contact legal representation. A property owner has a responsibility to uphold, and that includes keeping any children under their supervision safe from hazardous property conditions. For more information about premises liabilities, contact a knowledgeable attorney from our firm today.

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