Recalled Medication: Dangerous Things Come in Small Packages

Last year a multistate outbreak of meningitis was tied to contaminated steroids produced by a manufacturer operating under non-sterile conditions. To date, 64 people died as a result, and hundreds others suffered associated infections.

Consumers usually assume a drug they receive or are prescribed is safe for its use as intended. When a drug is mistakenly prescribed, contaminated or adulterated, serious injury or death can result. Consider these recent recalls from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA):

  • In September, GE Pharma of North Haven recalled Creafuse Powder products because they contain the stimulant DMAA. Previously, the FDA warned use of DMAA increases blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular events in individuals in good health. As of April of this year, the FDA received 68 reports of illness or death associated with ingestion of DMAA. The FDA continues to work to remove DMAA from consumer outlets.
  • McNeil Consumer Healthcare Division voluntarily recalled 200,000 bottles of Concentrated Motrin Infant Drops in September. The drug was recalled after bits of plastic the size of poppy seeds were discovered.
  • The FDA is advising consumers to throw away sexual enhancement products marketed under the name Xzen 1200, Xzen Gold or Xzen Xpress. Sold via websites and in retail stores, the products contain undeclared ingredients, including drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction.

The danger of defective medication is often not apparent until injury occurs. If there is a chance you or a loved one is a victim of a pharmaceutical defect in North Carolina, seek reputable legal advice.

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