When the Party Is Over: Watch Out for Dangerous Toys

Everyone hopes toys given to children provide fun times throughout the year. This year, make sure the toys your children receive bring only good memories by watching out for those that could be dangerous. 

Our firm represents individuals and families injured by defective or dangerous products, including toys. Every year the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) releases a review of toy safety. This year, its Troubles in Toyland report highlights hazards for popular toys of the 2013 holiday season: 

  • For several years, PIRG has warned of toxic metals and other chemicals in toys. Lead, phthalates and other compounds cause neurological damage and other permanent injuries to developing children. Lead might be used in brightly colored paint or plastics as a softening agent. 
  • Choking hazards continue to be a problem with toys. While balloons and balls present an obvious concern, parts that break off a toy are also dangerous. This year, PIRG notes the danger of toys that barely pass the cylinder test simulating the windpipe of a child. Small pieces of toy food are inherently dangerous to young children who may mouth or try to swallow the toy. 
  • The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and PIRG remain concerned about small magnets in toys. While the CPSC has mounted a campaign against small toys formerly marketed as Buckyballs, PIRG cautions the buying public about small magnets of differing sizes that could be swallowed. Modern magnets are stronger than the kitchen magnets of old. Rare-earth magnets are particularly strong, and while they may lead to amazing feats during play, they can cause devastating damage when swallowed. 

Make sure the fun does not end with a defective toy. If your child is injured in Raleigh, speak with reputable legal counsel for advice.

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